Survey: research priorities for conservation & natural resource management in Oceania

As conservation scientists, most of us hope to conduct research that will be useful to practitioners, and will ultimately "make a difference". However, it remains unclear whether the areas towards which we are investing our research efforts will actually produce the information that conservation practitioners and natural resource managers need. Understanding the information that decision-makers … Continue reading Survey: research priorities for conservation & natural resource management in Oceania

Registration support available for members from Pacific Islands to attend ICCB 2015

iccb-eccb2015SCB Oceania have funds available to cover the registration fees for two members attending ICCB 2015 in Montpellier. To be considered, please e-mail Rebecca with the subject “SCBO conference support” by 12 noon AEST on May 7th and include: - proof of abstract acceptance - whether you are a student - whether you have secured travel funds to attend the conference, will have someone to present on your behalf, or would send a poster

Cool new conservation science, April 2015

Three new papers that caught our eye: Aaron MacNeil & colleagues' analysis of fish declines in coral reefs shows that simple fishing limits and implementation of marine protected areas can be enough to support recovery of coral ecosystem resilience. Christophe Cleguer & colleagues found a mismatch between important dugong habitats and marine protected areas in New Caledonia. Megan Evans and colleagues found that assisting vegetation to grow back naturally could be a far more profitable way for farmers to lock in carbon than the more commonly considered method of planting trees and shrubs.